Introduction to Strong Cryptography – p0

Posted: June 6, 2011 in cryptography
Tags: , , ,

One thing that amazes me is that the most developers are not familiar with strong cryptography. In my career, I’ve seen all sort of mistakes that lead to leaked data, guessable passwords, unfortunate disclosures, and worse. The nice thing is, you don’t have to understand the ridiculously complex math behind the algorithms, you only have to know the rules for using them correctly. By the end of this series, my goal is to de-mystify the magic, so you can start using the primitives in your code right away!

But first, when I say Strong Cryptography, what the hell am I referring to anyway?

Strong cryptography or cryptographically strong are general terms applied cryptographic systems or components that are considered highly resistant to cryptanalysis.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strong_cryptography

So Strong Cryptography is not some esoteric concept you are not privy to: Strong Cryptography is simply a set of definitions and algorithms that have been reviewed by experts, secret government agencies, and third-party organizations and found to be hard to break.

One thing I’ve seen repeatedly done is that developer ‘invents’ a cryptography scheme for a particular purpose. Here’s the thing, cryptography is thousands of years old. If you’ve ever ‘invented’ your own way to ‘encrypt’ data, chances are you’ve just re-invented something that has been discovered thousandsof years ago. If you want to avoid the mistakes that WEP made with wireless, Microsoft did with the XBox, or Sony made with the PS3, this blog series should help you avoid embarrassment, AND give you something impressive to say at the next cocktail party.

Finally, I just wanted to mention this is actually a very personal subject that I have a long history with. I found my first need for cryptography was passing notes to my friends as we played “Spies” in the neighborhood and needed to keep the locations of our secret forts safe. Unfortunately, my single letter substitution cipher must have been broken by some whiz kid as our treehouse was destroyed that summer… After reading Alvin’s Secret Code, we then created 2-3 sets of Caesar wheels and never lost a secret fort again!

I hope you enjoy the series!

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Comments
  1. […] p1.0 – Hash functions, US patriots By Jonathan This article is one of many in my Strong Cryptography series. Today we’ll be covering one of the most useful Strong Cryptography primitives: The Hash […]

  2. […] Hashing, Hash Attacks, MACs, Shakespeare 22 August 2011 // 0 This article is one of many in my Strong Cryptography series. Today we’ll dive into some deeper to some Hashing […]

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